Connection: What Every Educator & Learner Needs

I’ve come to realize that there are few things more important to learners and educators than to belong to a community that embodies what we all want and need: personal connection, an opportunity to grow, and people to do it with who encourage, support, and stretch us in ways that allow us to meet our potential. In this era of hurried living and convenience concept inventions, like DoorDash to deliver a hot meal from most any restaurant, not just the local pizza place, and Shipt, that will save you a trip to the grocery store if you still wish to cook at home, but don’t have the time or energy to complete a physical trip, connection has become a commodity.

People are seeking authentic networks-both personal and professional ones; they are in search of belonging, of purpose, of contributing to a cause greater than themselves. What’s interesting about how technology has in some ways given us an opportunity to be more widely connected to events and organizations, and even people, in a sense, across the globe, it’s also elevated the deep desire of all humans- to be linked and intimately connected to others. We all need that experience and opportunity to laugh, love, and live a full life. No matter how convenient some of the revolutionary technology may have made some of our routine activities, we still have a deep need to be connected to one another.

While we may be thrilled to not have to stop by the grocery store on our commute home from work, pressing “like” on our social media applications isn’t the same as saying, “Hi. How are you?,” and giving someone you haven’t “seen” in some time a big hug. No matter how well technology allows us to “see” our family and friends via pictures, videos, and posts, what we gain by being a part of a community and sharing successes, failures, triumphs, and struggles together cannot be compared. It is the process that comes with these experiences that ends up linking us to others for an extended friendship, sometimes for a lifetime.

As I attended the first personalized learning conference in South Carolina today, I was struck by an ever present theme that ran through the entire construct: relationships. At the center of being able to personalize learning experiences for students is the ability to develop a connection that is authentic and trusting enough to support educators in designing teaching and learning activities that work for each child. Without this connection, the power of flexible learning environments, learner profiles, learner pathways, and student ownership is limited. What personalized learning asks us to do as educators is to honor the human element at the center of our work: students. In order to provide our students with an equitable learning experience that creates a guaranteed opportunity for reaching the outcomes they set for themselves and we set for them, we must start by being connected to the students we are teaching and to our colleagues who are in this work with us.

That connection must not be underestimated. It is the sustaining element and critical factor in making personalized learning more than an idea, an initiative, or the latest and greatest ed reform topic. It’s personal and that is why I believe it is at the heart of what educators and students alike need-a trusting community of peers and partners to learn, grow, thrive, and connect with to live full lives where each person can be sure their potential isn’t underestimated or out of reach.

In the years and decades to come, I believe this need for personal connection, strong, trusting, relationships, and learning communities will remain a solid and essential concept in our profession. Above all else, we’ll continue to find that our relationships with one another are really the glue that holds us all together.

Until next time! Be you! Be true! Be a hope builder!

Latoya

@latoyadixon5

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